Korean Learning Resources

Korean Family and Kinship Terms

Being a Singaporean Chinese, I know most Chinese family and kinship terms, but I only know the basic Korean ones, so I’ve been trying to find a list since forever.

I’m glad I stumbled upon this detailed list. It’s going to be so useful especially now that it’s the Lunar New Year and Korean friends have been asking how I spend it.

the talking cupboard

I’m sure some of you who watch kdramas are already familiar with the titles used in the family, as in how a  person address his or her family members. I got used to hear a servant or maid calling the young master and miss as doryeonnim (도련님) and agasshi (아가씨) in dramas but when I watched another dramas, I was surprised to hear a woman addressing her younger brother and sister-in-law as doryeonnim and agasshi. I then realized that there are various ways of calling your relatives in Korean culture. It’s not as simple as uncles and aunts!

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Korean Learning Journey, Korean Learning Resources

7 Tips for Learning a New Language by TED

I’ve never agreed more with an article; I actually did all of these tips in my Korean language learning journey.

Knowing more than one language is great for your brain. But what’s the best way to learn? TED’s Open Translation Project volunteers share 7 tips:

  1. Get real. Decide on a simple, attainable goal to start with so that you don’t feel overwhelmed. German translator Judith Matz suggests: “Pick up 50 words of a language and start using them on people — and then slowly start picking up grammar.”
  2. Make language-learning a lifestyle changeElisabeth Buffard has been teaching English for 27 years. She says that consistency is what separates the most successful students from the rest. Find a language habit that you can follow even when you’re tired, sick or madly in love.
  3. Play house with the language. The more you invite a foreign language into your daily life, the more your brain will consider it something worth remembering. “Use every opportunity to get exposed to the new language,” says Russian translator Olga Dmitrochenkova. For example, you might label objects in your house in the language, read kids’ books written in it, or watch subtitled TED-Ed Originals.
  4. Let technology help you out. Dmitrochenkova has a great idea: “A funny thing like resetting the language on your phone can help you learn new words right away,” she says. Ditto for changing the language on your browser. Or you can seek out more structured learning opportunities online. Dutch translator Els De Keyser recommends Duolinguo for its approach to grammar, and Anki for memorizing vocabulary with its “intelligent” flashcards.
  5. Think about language-learning as a gateway to new experiences. To Spanish translator Sebastián Betti, learning a language has always been about focusing on the experiences that the new language would open up, from “visiting theme parks, to enjoying cowboy poetry and folk-rock festivals, to learning about photo-essay techniques.” In other words, he thinks of fun things that he wanted to do anyway, and makes them into a language-learning opportunity. Many of our translators shared this advice. For example, Italian and French translator Anna Minoli learned English by watching undubbed versions of her favorite movies, while Croatian translator Ivan Stamenković suddenly realized he could speak English in fifth grade, after years of watching the Cartoon Network without subtitles. So the next time you need a vegan carrot cake recipe, find one in the language you’re trying to learn.
  6. Make new friends. Interacting in the new language is key — it will teach you to intuitively express your thoughts, instead of mentally translating each sentence before you say it. Find native speakers near you. Or search for foreign penpals or set up a language tandem online, where two volunteers help one another practice their respective languages.
  7. Do not worry about making mistakes. One of the most common barriers to conversing in a new language is the fear of making mistakes. But native speakers are like doting parents: any attempt from you to communicate in their language is objective proof that you are a gifted genius. They’ll appreciate your effort and even help you. Nervous about holding a conversation with a peer? Try testing your language skills with someone a little younger. “I was stoked when I was chatting with an Italian toddler and realized we had the same level of Italian,” recalls German translator Judith Matz. And be patient. The more you speak, the closer you’ll get to the elusive ideal of “native-like fluency.” And to talking to people your own age.

Korean Learning Resources

Self-study Korean with Yonsei KLI on YouTube!

So I stumbled upon Yonsei KLI’s YouTube! I didn’t even know they had a YouTube, so I scrolled through and noticed it was only created at the end of 2015.

If you didn’t know, I studied in Yonsei KLI Level 4~6 in 2013, and I loved it!

으리 데이앤데이 이모티콘

I haven’t watched through all of them, but seeing as how slowly the teachers speak in the few I fast forwarded through, I think they are mainly teaching beginner Korean, including grammar points and vocabulary. I’m not sure why, but some have subtitles, while others don’t. Either way, it seems like a good resource for self-learners!

Here are some samples:

(The guy in the below video looks so familiar! I think I saw him around school before.)

The rest can be found on their YouTube here.

More Korean language learning resources can be found here.

Korean Learning Resources

RESOURCES; How To Count To A Billion In Korean by Ryan Estrada

I started following Ryan Estrada when he was drawing LiveJournal’s Frank the comic in 2009. That was way before I knew anything about Korean.

His Learn To Read Korean In 15 Minutes comic got so popular that he has now made a sequel, How To Count To A Billion In Korean. It actually does as brilliant a job as the first. xD

His other works are a good read too if you’re interested. Check below for links.

Continue reading “RESOURCES; How To Count To A Billion In Korean by Ryan Estrada”

Korean Books, Korean Learning Journey, Korean Learning Resources, Korean Merchandise

LEARNING JOURNEY; 태양아~ ㅠㅠ

Reading Taeyang‘s chapter in 세상에 너를 소리쳐! and this part made my heart hurt. ;_; 지금 이렇게 잘되서 정말 다행이고 기뻐요 태양씨^^ 새로운 미니 앨범도 듣고 있는데 짱임!! ㅎㅎ